I was recently asked, how much can you make by selling online. You don’t often find someone who has the b— (I mean, guts) to actually answer this question. It helps if you’re actually making money online, I suppose. I mean, if you’re not raking in income, why talk about it?

Anyway, John Saddington answered this question on his Tentblogger blog (www.tentblogger.com). This site is a gold mine when it comes to creating and marketing a blog. John also sells products online, so his e-commerce strategy is pretty diversified.

In this post, John projected that his income from blogging and online sales of products like WordPress themes would come to $44,000. He is able to support a wife and child just from blogging. Now, this was just a projection. I asked him for an update as to the real figure. I’ll report back on what he says.

When I think about this, I can’t help but wonder, having written 40-odd books, where I would be if I had started blogging in earnest five or ten years ago–when my agent was telling me to do just that. But there’s no point in going there. What are the takeaways I get from Tentblogger’s example?

  1. Diversify. Don’t just do one thing. John sells ads, products, consults, is an affiliate, etc.
  2. Make Connections. I’m starting to sound like a broken record, I know. But blogging, and connecting with vendors, sellers, and colleagues, is the way to build a platform. And that platform leads to revenue. In Saddington’s case, it leads to a lot of ad revenue.
  3. Be open. Don’t keep secrets. Let people know about yourself and what you do. Get personal. That’s what keeps people coming back to this guy’s blog. Share, and you’ll get back in the form of comments, visits, RSS subscriptions, and hopefully purchases.
  4. Make an every-day commitment. That’s what I’m doing now, and that’s what gives your blog, your website, and your store value. Not only does it help your SEO, but it gives people a reason to keep visiting you.

This fellow also obviously has fun with his site. He has nice cartoons of himself, and funny photos. You should do the same, even if you only sell products in a single online storefront. Talk about yourself; get a little personal; use humor; you’ll grab people and keep them coming back to you in the future. Stay with it for a long period of time. If you are blogging, Saddington suggests waiting at least six months before you even attempt to take out ads. (He had the requisite number of unique visitors, 250 per day, at only three months, however. I’m nearly there and I’ve only really been blogging in earnest for less than one month.) Eventually, you’ll start to generate sales.

I neglected to mention one more way to make money without a website. It’s something I wrote a whole book called Affiliate Millions about it with Anthony Borelli, who is the guru in this field. It’s placing very cleverly written Google AdWords ads, and other affiliate ads, that get people to click on them–a lot. With each referral, you make money.

Tony has made a lot of money this way. It’s not for the fainthearted though. It can be a little like day trading: you can lose a lot of money if people click and click on your ad and never take an action that generates an affiliate fee for you (in other words, they never make a purchase, they never take out a subscription, etc.). When it works, though, it can be very exciting. You can find out more about it on his website.

Update: I thought of one more option for making money without a website. How could I forget that I co-wrote a whole book about this?

Amazon.com,Facebook, WordPress, storefronts, and e-commerce marketplaces: These are all potential “home bases” for you online. I used to write that you had to have a website in order to make money online. And websites are still important, don’t get me wrong. But there are a lot more options available these days. Here are some examples:

eBay

This is sort of the obvious place to start an online business. You can create an eBay Store, or you can simply list dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of products on this venerable marketplace without having a formal store. eBay is great as a starting point for anyone wanting to learn how to do business online. But more and more people, turned off by its fees and cumbersome rules for sellers, are turning to other venues to find customers.

Add on to Amazon.com

Some people–booksellers in particular–sell their books by adding them to Amazon.com marketplace listings. Their products show up here:

I wrote an article on ECommerceBytes about several sellers who, to my knowledge, don’t sell through a website, but primarily through Amazon, Alibris, and ABEBooks.
Marketplaces

If you open a storefront on eCrater, Bonanza, or Webstore.com, you don’t need to create your own full-fledged website from scratch. The marketplace gives you a head start

WordPress or Another Blogging Platform

A blog can take the centerpiece of your online presence. A platform as robust as WordPress can host a blog and lots of web pages. essentially, it is a website, but one that you can update by posting on a regular basis. My Buddhist meditation group, Jewel Heart, uses WordPress for all of its website content. In fact, if there is a blog on this site it’s a very minor part of the content.

A Facebook Kiosk

Facebook is good for marketing and networking and just having fun. Some people use it for e-commerce, too. You can sell on Facebook through an online kiosk. I’ve written about her before, but Kharisma Ryantori uses her Facebook page to advertise, and sell, her jewelry designs, as shown  below.

Twitter: Sell Simp.ly

You can do more and more with Twitter. Some dedicated Tweeters advertise and sell products through the site in short and sweet sales listings. Read about it in this article on the site called Sell Simply.

The bottom line: you need a “home base”, but that doesn’t mean you need to create a website from scratch. You can grow into a website, but you don’t have to start there. Start by piggybacking onto someone else’s site, whether it’s eBay, eCrater, Facebook, or Twitter. Get used to creating sales listings and handling a few transactions. Then you can create a website with confidence–and link to your various marketplaces from it, so can you boost your SEO.

Affiliate Marketing

September 14th, 2009

I notice that my article on affiliate marketing is mentioned on the home page of the AuctionBytes Web site. A direct link is here. The people at Commission Junction were very helpful. It’s always a good idea to get other people to do your advertising for you.