I was recently asked, how much can you make by selling online. You don’t often find someone who has the b— (I mean, guts) to actually answer this question. It helps if you’re actually making money online, I suppose. I mean, if you’re not raking in income, why talk about it?

Anyway, John Saddington answered this question on his Tentblogger blog (www.tentblogger.com). This site is a gold mine when it comes to creating and marketing a blog. John also sells products online, so his e-commerce strategy is pretty diversified.

In this post, John projected that his income from blogging and online sales of products like WordPress themes would come to $44,000. He is able to support a wife and child just from blogging. Now, this was just a projection. I asked him for an update as to the real figure. I’ll report back on what he says.

When I think about this, I can’t help but wonder, having written 40-odd books, where I would be if I had started blogging in earnest five or ten years ago–when my agent was telling me to do just that. But there’s no point in going there. What are the takeaways I get from Tentblogger’s example?

  1. Diversify. Don’t just do one thing. John sells ads, products, consults, is an affiliate, etc.
  2. Make Connections. I’m starting to sound like a broken record, I know. But blogging, and connecting with vendors, sellers, and colleagues, is the way to build a platform. And that platform leads to revenue. In Saddington’s case, it leads to a lot of ad revenue.
  3. Be open. Don’t keep secrets. Let people know about yourself and what you do. Get personal. That’s what keeps people coming back to this guy’s blog. Share, and you’ll get back in the form of comments, visits, RSS subscriptions, and hopefully purchases.
  4. Make an every-day commitment. That’s what I’m doing now, and that’s what gives your blog, your website, and your store value. Not only does it help your SEO, but it gives people a reason to keep visiting you.

This fellow also obviously has fun with his site. He has nice cartoons of himself, and funny photos. You should do the same, even if you only sell products in a single online storefront. Talk about yourself; get a little personal; use humor; you’ll grab people and keep them coming back to you in the future. Stay with it for a long period of time. If you are blogging, Saddington suggests waiting at least six months before you even attempt to take out ads. (He had the requisite number of unique visitors, 250 per day, at only three months, however. I’m nearly there and I’ve only really been blogging in earnest for less than one month.) Eventually, you’ll start to generate sales.